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Romans 8:3 – How God’s Son Condemned Sin in the Flesh

March 25, 2014 by
Filed under: Sin, The Flesh, The Law Covenant, Uncategorized 


“For what was impossible for the Law in that it was weak through the flesh, God having sent his own Son in a form of the flesh of sin — even an offering for sin — condemned sin in the flesh, but according to spirit.” — Romans 8:3, Diaglott

The King James Version of this text is frequently misconstrued by some. It reads: “God sending his own Son in the likeness of sinful flesh,” etc. Some, who have a theory to support, would have us understand this: that since God sent his Son in the sinful likeness of flesh, then Jesus took a sinful nature and was with us under the same condemnation. That this is not the teaching of the apostle Paul should be obvious to every intelligent and candid reader. The imperfections of mind and body, now so common to our race, are the direct traces and marks of either personal or inherited sin. We know that Jesus had neither. In him was no sin, therefore no evidence or marks of it. — Hebrews 7:26; 1 Peter 2:22.

The likeness of sinful flesh simply means that he suffered as though he were a bond-servant under condemnation of sin as the rest of mankind. (1 Peter 2:21-24; Philippians 2:7,8; Romans 8:21) Jesus experienced the woes and sufferings of humanity without sharing in the imperfections and sins. He suffered for and with those around him. He made use of his own vitality, as given to him by God (John 6:57), in healing their diseases. Doubtless, on many occasions, it might have been recorded, as in Mark 5:30; Luke 6:19 and 8:46, that the power or virtue that healed the sick “went out of him.” (Matthew 8:17) It is the most refined and perfect organisms that can suffer most.

To appreciate the drift and force of the apostle’s teaching in this passage, we must remember that he is explaining the value and use of the Law given to Israel, through Moses, and its relationship to the dedicated sons of God. He handles it fully, for he writes to those who know the Law. — Romans 7:1.

Glancing back we find his argument to be that the slightest command of God is a Law for those to whom it is applied. The smallest violation of Law is sin; the wages of the smallest sin is death — the extinction of existence. (Romans 6:23) Therefore, it will be seen, that to be disobedient in the smallest degree meant a corruption from perfect obedience to God’s Law, which meant sin and its punishment. Hence only one man — Adam — was tried, and that on only one point of Law. When he disobeyed in a very small thing – his was not a flagrant sin – he was a violator of Law — a sinner — under condemnation of death. All his offspring would, of course, partake of his condemnation and degradation of flesh, resulting in death. — Romans 1:28-31; 5:18.

“It is impossible for the blood of bulls and goats to take away sins.” — Hebrews 10:4.

Starting with Abel, faithful men of God offered lambs, bulls, and goats as sacrifices to Jehovah (Yahweh). They did this because of they realized that they could not make themselves perfect. They evidently understood that they needed an atoning sacrifice to God because of their sin. They knew that they needed a clearing from condemnation and punishment. But mankind did not fully understand the depth of his own degradation. They did not realize that their very nature was now sinful. (Romans 1:28; Ephesians 2:3) Jehovah therefore desired to teach man a lesson regarding sin. Man had to be shown by a demonstration that it was impossible for any imperfect being to keep a perfect law. He gave Israel a typical “Day of Atonement,” and a typical justification from Adamic sin. But these typical sacrifices for sin could never take away sin. Moses delivered this law to them at Sinai. It was declared that “whoever does these things will live.” If they could have kept that law, by reason of their obedience they would live and never die. — Romans 10:5; Galatians 3:12; Leviticus 18:5; Hebrews 10:1-3.

“All that Jehoah has spoken we will do.” — Exodus 19:7,8.

Alas, for poor humanity’s self-confidence. That which they thought would be a means of gaining life, was found to emphatically condemn all under it to death, as transgressors unworthy of life. (Romans 7:10-13) As throughout the Jewish Age, hundreds and thousands attempted to keep the commandment “which was ordained to life,” but were unable. (Romans 7:10) For them, it proved either one of two things: either that fallen humanity was as God claimed, unable to help himself back to perfection, or else that the Law given was too severe. Paul’s argument is that the Law was not too severe. He claims that the Law is holy — the commandments of Jehovah are holy, and just, and good for man. He tells us that the trouble is that man is imperfect — depraved — sold under sin — in slavery to sin — in bondage to corruption — made this way because of the first man’s sin. — Romans 7:12-18; 8:21.

“If a law had been given which was able to impart life, then righteousness would indeed have been based on law.” — Galatians 3:21b.

The question was, then: Would God modify his just, holy and good law, so that a certain amount of sin could be excused and so that he could allow those who are imperfect to live? We answer: No! Such a law would have been a violation by God of his own law. It would have been imperfect. Such a law would justify sin instead of justifying the sinner from the sin. Therefore Paul argues that if a law could have been given which would have given life back to humans, then undoubtedly God would have provided man with that law, and not have sent his Son to be our ransom and the satisfaction for our sins. But God is the author of only right and perfect laws. He cannot look upon sin with any degree of approval. (Deuteronomy 32:4; Psalm 5:4) Hence the law remains, and will to all eternity — “The soul that sins, it will die.” — Ezekiel 18:4.

“Did that which is good become a cause of death for me? No, never! Rather it was sin, in order that it might be shown to be sin by effecting death through that which is good, that through the commandment sin might become utterly sinful.” — Romans 8:13.

There have been and still are many who try to justify themselves, to make themselves righteous. These believe they can escape God’s condemnation through Adam by keeping laws. Indeed, from the human standpoint these may be excellent people. They therefore often seem to feel that their depravity is not so very great. However, this could lead them to believe that the law must be too severe. Nevertheless, Jehovah has given proof of the justness of his Law. The possibility that a perfect man could keep the law has been demonstrated. This was all part of Jehovah’s plan. Hence, when Jesus came to redeem mankind, he was tempted in all points — by the world, the flesh and the devil. (Hebrews 4:15) He was born under the same law which had been condemning others for over 1400 years. The fact that he as a man — a perfect man — did keep the perfect law, is a part of the proof Jehovah offers us that the law was not too severe, but the fault had been that all were under the curse — imperfect — and therefore could not keep it.

“Knowing that a man is not justified by the works of the law but through faith in Christ Jesus, even we have believed in Christ Jesus, that we may be justified by faith in Christ, and not by works of the law.” — Galatians 2:16.

Jesus’ life, instead of proving that the law is imperfect, and that, therefore, God should cast it aside, proved the very opposite — it set the seal or mark of approval and righteousness to the law, and of condemnation to the race of sinners. Jesus not only sanctioned the law and met its requirements by his own obedience to it, but more, he met its requirements upon the condemned race by giving himself (as a spotless human being) a ransom for them. Thus he purchased the Law’s claims upon the entire race. And it is elsewhere declared to be his plan — in due time to assume control of his “purchased possession,” and to subdue and restore whosoever will of the race to the original perfection. Then mankind, being perfect, will be able to keep God’s perfect law perfectly, and have a right to continued life as a result. When Jesus will have done this, he will deliver up the kingdom (dominion) to God his Father. — 1 Corinthians 15:24.

“He condemned sin in the flesh, in order that the requirement of the Law might be fulfilled in us, who do not walk according to the flesh, but according to the spirit.” — Romans 8:3b,4.

Note the fullness and power of the apostle’s words in Romans 8:3: “For what was impossible for the Law [to do for us, that is, give us a right to life] in that it was weak through the flesh [it was powerless due to the weakness and imperfection of our sin-stricken flesh],” God accomplished in another way. Did Jehovah have to give another law, an imperfect law, to accomplish his purpose? No, but on the contrary, he proved his law given to be just and holy by sending his Son in a human form — the same form as that of the sinners who had been condemned — a second Adam. Jesus not only proved the law to be just and good, but then, by offering his flesh FOR our sins, condemned sin in the flesh, so that the righteousness of the law may be fulfilled in us [who accept of his sacrifice for our sins], who do not walk according to [not in pursuit of] the flesh, but according to [in pursuit of] the spirit [meaning or intent] of the law.

==============

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With What Kind of Body Will We Be Raised?

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Matthew 5:17,18 – The Fulfilling of the Law

The Son of God Was Either God or a Bad Man?

1 Peter 3:18 – Raised in the Spirit

1 Timothy 3:16 – Mystery of Godliness Revealed

The Law, the Veil, and the New Covenant

Justified by Faith and Works (James 2:14-26)

The World Will See Me No More – John 14:19

 

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22 Comments on Romans 8:3 – How God’s Son Condemned Sin in the Flesh

    […] In these verses, Paul discusses Israel’s relationship with God — Yahweh. He says that they are ignorant of God’s righteousness (Romans 3:22), and sought to make themselves righteous by means of obedience to the Law. Then he reveals that the righteousness of God is in Christ, who is the end of the law [covenant] to everyone who believes. See: “How God’s Son Condemned Sin in the Flesh” […]

  1. Assorted Proof Texts Concerning the Trinity on Sat, 24th Sep 2011 1:25 pm
  2. […] How God’s Son Condemned Sin the Flesh […]

  3. 1 Timothy 3:16 – Mystery of Godliness Revealed on Tue, 18th Oct 2011 5:46 pm
  4. […] Romans 8:3 – How God’s Son Condemned Sin in the Flesh Possibly Related:1 Timothy 3:16 – Mystery of the Godhead?Genesis 3:22 – Like One of Us, Knowing Good and EvilJohn 1:14 – The Logos Made FleshIsaiah 42:8 – Does God Share His Glory as Most High With Jesus?Colossians 1:15 – Firstborn of the New Creation?Son of Man and Son of God1 John 1:1-3 – That Which Was From the BeginningWas Jesus Divine as a Human?Light, Darkness and the LogosDid Jesus Need to be Uncreated to Pay for the Sin of the World?1 Timothy 6:13-16 – Without SpotWho is Jesus?Genesis 1:26,27 – Who Is God speaking to?Jesus’ Pre-human ExistenceLuke 24:39 – Jesus’ Appearances in the Locked RoomJohn 17:5 – Jesus’ Prehuman GloryRomans 5:5,6 – God’s Love, Holy Spirit, Christ’s DeathJesus is Not Yahweh (Jehovah)John 2:19-22 – Did Jesus Raise Himself from the Dead?John 7:38 – Living Water and Jesus’ ThirstPowered by Contextual Related Posts Updated: October 18, 2011 […]

    […] How God’s Son Condemned Sin the Flesh http://atonement.reslight.net/?p=51 […]

  5. Michael the Archangel | Jesus and His God on Sun, 30th Oct 2011 4:06 pm
  6. […] See: How God’s Son Condemned Sin in the Flesh […]

    […] Psalm 82:6 – Who Are the Gods? How God’s Son Condemned Sin in the Flesh Possibly Related:Jeremiah 31:9 – Ephraim as Yahweh’s firstbornWho is God?John 17:5 – Jesus’ Prehuman GloryGenesis 34:7 – The firstborn nation, IsraelRevelation 2:8 and the Alleged “Dual Nature” of ChristPsalm 89:27 – Yahweh’s Firstborn KingIsaiah 9:6 and the Alleged TrinityHebrews 7:3 – Is Melchizedek an Eternal Priest?John 2:19-22 – Did Jesus Raise Himself from the Dead?Isaiah 9:6 – The Mighty God, The Everlasting FatherJesus is Not Yahweh (Jehovah)John 14:26; 15:26 – The Comforter – Is It a Person?John 1:14 – The Logos Made FleshLuke 24:39 – Jesus’ Appearances in the Locked RoomThere is Only One True GodYahweh sent the Messiah (Isaiah 61:1)Ephesians 5:27Hebrews 1:8 – Why is Jesus called “Elohim” and “Theos”? Psalm 45:6,7Who is Jesus?Joel 3:11-12 and Matthew 25:31-32 – Both Yahweh Judges and His Son JudgesPowered by Contextual Related Posts Tags: children of God, God's Children, John 1:12 […]

    […] See “How God’s Son Condemned Sin in the Flesh” http://atonement.reslight.net/?p=51 […]

    […] Others claim that Adam was created with a sinful nature, and thus his flesh would have died regardless of whether he ate the fruit or not. Some dualists even claim that Jesus’ flesh was also of the sinful nature. Thus, in applying this idea to 1 Peter 3:18, some claim that Jesus had to die to his sinful flesh and be spiritually made alive. See the study: “How God’s Son Condemned Sin in the Flesh” http://atonement.reslight.net/?p=51 […]

    […] Privacy Policy You are here : Focus on the Atonement » Jesus' sacrifice, Sin, The Flesh, The Law Covenant » Romans 8:3 – How God’s Son Condemned Sin in the Flesh  Print This Post […]

  7. David on Tue, 7th Aug 2012 7:22 pm
  8. This is a great exposition of the subject. However I would like to share something that I believe has been missed by many, including the author. When God created Adam (man), he was not created “perfect”, and he did not “fall” as such. If he were perfect, he could not fall. A closer look at the Scripture reveals that , when speaking of Eve…..”And the woman saw that the tree was good for food, and was pleasant to the eyes, and a tree to be desired to make one wise….” She already had the desire to sin. The “lust of the flesh, the lust of the eyes, and the pride of life” was already in man. And even entertaining the thought to disobey, is to violate the spirit ( meaning and intent ) of the law. God created man sinful. Man at creation was “very good” ( not perfect ) for the intent purposed by God.
    When God said, “Let us manke man in our image, after our likeness”, God was infering that He WILL make man in His image. The “image” of the Father, is the Son (Christ). And this “creation” is ongoing to this day. It is a process in time. And in God’s time, and according to His will and purpose, ALL of mankind will attain to this “image”.

  9. ResLight on Sat, 18th Jan 2014 10:19 pm
  10. David
    Submitted on 2012/08/07:

    Somehow, I missed replying to this comment earlier.

    David
    Submitted on 2012/08/07:

    This is a great exposition of the subject. However I would like to share something that I believe has been missed by many, including the author. When God created Adam (man), he was not created “perfect”, and he did not “fall” as such.

    I would suppose that this would really depend on what one means by “perfect”. Adam was perfect in that he was sinless and he did not have any condemnation of sin until he actually sinned. Death was not in the world until Adam sinned. (Romans 5:12-19) Before Adam sinned he had the unmarred crown of the glory of his God, untarnished with sin. (Psalm 8:4,5) Once he sinned, however, he did indeed “fall” short of that glory. (Romans 3:23) As a result, Adam and all in Adam were counted as having been made sinners. — Romans 5:12-19.

    As a result, God subjected all mankind to vanity as being under a bondage of corruption, having been made crooked, and could not make themselves straight. — Ecclesiastes 1:2,14,15; 7:13; Romans 8:20-22; 2 Peter 1:4.

    James 1:14 WEB
    But each one is tempted, when he is drawn away by his own lust, and enticed.

    James, of course, was speaking of Christians who were already of sinful flesh. He was not speaking of Eve. Eve, like Adam, had the freedom to either obey or disobey.

    2 Corinthians 11:3 WEB
    But I am afraid that by any means, as the serpent deceived Eve in his craftiness, so your minds might be corrupted from the simplicity that is in Christ.

    There is no evidence that Eve had any desire to sin until a desire was suggested to her by the serpent that she would become wise if she disobeyed God. In this whe was deceived, and thus developed a desire for what the serpent promised. Thus, she thought about it until she finally disobeyed (Genesis 3:1-6).

    Genesis 9:6 KJV
    Whoso sheddeth man’s blood, by man shall his blood be shed: for in the image of God made he man.

    I have no doubt that this refers back to man’s original creation in the Garden of Eden; it certainly is not speaking of a future time when Jesus comes.

    If Adam was not originally made in the image of God, not having marred that image and glory of God in him through sin, then there would have been no need for Jesus to have come separate from the old creation that has been subjected to vanity. Indeed, such a idea would, if were true, negate the entire scriptural basis of the ransom sacrifice of Jesus as given in the Bible.

    […] God was justified — proven righteous — in Christ’s spirit of obedience, proving that God’s just laws and commands for man are not unjust, by which Jesus condemned sin in the flesh, and yet, through the ransom sacrifice of Jesus, God is the justifier of the sinner. — Romans 3:25,26; 8:3. See: How God’s Son Condemned Sin in the Flesh […]

    […] The Greek word “godliness” is transliterated as “Eusebeia” which means “reverence, respect, piety toward God.”* Many have read into the English word “godliness” that Jesus is the Supreme Being. Actually, Paul is talking about the mystery of godliness, of godlikeness that was revealed in, through, by means of, Jesus. Jesus was the first and only human to bring to light life and incorruption. (2 Timothy 1:10) Unlike our first father, Adam, Jesus never disobeyed his God. Although tempted to sin, even as was Adam, he spent his entire life without committing a sin. (John 8:46; 2 Corinthians 5:21; Hebrews 4:15; 7:26) In doing so, he condemned sin the flesh**, since, he — a human like Adam — and tempted toward sin, did not sin. He proved himself incorruptible, thus bringing life and incorruption to light, thereby proving himself to be the manifestation of the righteousness of God in human flesh. — Romans 1:16,17; 2 Corinthians 5:21 ======== *Thayer and Smith. “Greek Lexicon entry for Eusebeia”. “The KJV New Testament Greek Lexicon”. http://www.biblestudytools.com/lexicons/greek/kjv/eusebeia.html. **See our study: “How God’s Son Condemned Sin the Flesh” […]

    […] Many trinitarians, however, claim that this submission is one person of God to another person of God. In reality, nowhere does the Bible ever even give a hint that one being equals three persons. All through the Bible, the God of Abraham, Isaac, and Jacob is spoken of as unipersonal God; he never presents Himself as more than one person, and no Bible writer ever speaks of Him as more than one person. The trinitarian thought has to added to and read into each and every scripture presented to allegedly support the trinity, and imaginative interpretations, such as the one just mentioned, have to offered to make many other scriptures seem to be in harmony with the added on doctrine. As a result, what is actually presented as proof of the trinity is what the trinitarian leads a person to imagine and assume regarding a verse, and not what is actually said. The trinitarian feels he needs to add all this to the Bible in order to maintain the concept of “monotheism”. But there is more to this than this, for many of them believe, contrary to what the scriptures say, that a “man” could not redeem man. Many of them tell us that Jesus had to be God in order to pay the price for sin, although there is no scripture anywhere that says such. Indeed, all the scriptures declare that what was required was “a [sinless] man”, not God, to give himself in sacrifice to God. God did not sacrifice himself to himself. (Romans 5:12-19; 1 Corinthians 15:21,22; Ephesians 5:2; Philippians 4:18) Additionally, if Jesus was actually Yahweh in the flesh, as many claim, then rather than condemning sin in the flesh, he actually justified sin in the flesh. See our study: “How God’s Son Condemned Sin in the Flesh“. […]

    […] Many trinitarians, however, claim that this submission is one person of God to another person of God. In reality, nowhere does the Bible ever even give a hint that one being equals three persons. All through the Bible, the God of Abraham, Isaac, and Jacob is spoken of as unipersonal God; he never presents Himself as more than one person, and no Bible writer ever speaks of Him as more than one person. The trinitarian thought has to added to and read into each and every scripture presented to allegedly support the trinity, and imaginative interpretations, such as the one just mentioned, have to offered to make many other scriptures seem to be in harmony with the added on doctrine. As a result, what is actually presented as proof of the trinity is what the trinitarian leads a person to imagine and assume regarding a verse, and not what is actually said. The trinitarian feels he needs to add all this to the Bible in order to maintain the concept of “monotheism”. But there is more to this than this, for many of them believe, contrary to what the scriptures say, that a “man” could not redeem man. Many of them tell us that Jesus had to be God in order to pay the price for sin, although there is no scripture anywhere that says such. Indeed, all the scriptures declare that what was required was “a [sinless] man”, not God, to give himself in sacrifice to God. God did not sacrifice himself to himself. (Romans 5:12-19; 1 Corinthians 15:21,22; Ephesians 5:2; Philippians 4:18) Additionally, if Jesus was actually Yahweh in the flesh, as many claim, then rather than condemning sin in the flesh, he actually justified sin in the flesh. See our study: “How God’s Son Condemned Sin in the Flesh“. […]

    […] Jehovah, the Spirit and How God’s Son Condemned Sin in the Flesh […]

    […] deny the sacrifice of Jesus for sin. Had Jesus been “God [Almighty] in the flesh”, rather than condemning sin the flesh (Romans 8:3), Jesus would have justified sin the flesh, for it would have proven that for a sinless […]

    […] John tells us of Jesus that “in him was life, and the life was the light of men.” (John 1:4) What does this mean, that in Jesus, as a human “was life”? John 9:5 gives us the answer. Since Jesus, unlike Adam, was totally obedient, his sinless human life offered light to the dying race of mankind. Thus Jesus said: “As long as I am in the world, I am the light of the world.” (John 9:5, New King James version) The good news is that Jesus came with a perfect human life that he could offer in sacrifice to his God on man’s behalf in order to atone for the sin of the world. Thus Jesus, while a man, possessed life, and by his continued obedience brought life and incorruption to light. Jesus condemned sin in the flesh by showing that a sinless, incorrupt human can obey God’s laws. — Romans 8:3; 1 Timothy 1:10. ========== http://rlbible.com/atonement/?p=51 […]

    […] John tells us of Jesus that “in him was life, and the life was the light of men.” (John 1:4) What does this mean, that in Jesus, as a human “was life”? John 9:5 and 2 Timothy 1:10 give us a clue. Since Jesus, unlike Adam, was totally obedient, his sinless human life offered light to the dying race of mankind. Thus Jesus said: “As long as I am in the world, I am the light of the world.” (John 9:5, New King James version) The good news is that Jesus came with a sinless human life that he could offer in sacrifice to his God on man’s behalf in order to atone for the sin of the world. Thus Jesus, while a man, possessed life, and by his continued obedience brought life and incorruption to light. (2 Timothy 1:10) Jesus condemned sin in the flesh by showing that a sinless, incorrupt human can obey God’s laws. — Romans 8:3; 2 Timothy 1:10. ========== See: How God’s Son Condemned Sin the Flesh […]

    […] In these verses, Paul discusses Israel’s relationship with God — Jehovah. He says that they are ignorant of God’s righteousness (Romans 3:22), and sought to make themselves righteous by means of obedience to the Law. Then he reveals that the righteousness of God is in Christ, who is the end of the law [covenant] to everyone who believes. See: “How God’s Son Condemned Sin in the Flesh” […]

  11. Michael the Archangel « Jesus and His God on Sun, 5th Jul 2015 2:11 pm
  12. […] See: How God’s Son Condemned Sin in the Flesh […]

    […] Jesus Absolutely Nothing Was Created? Is Jesus Designated the Creator? What About 2 Timothy 1:10? How God’s Son Condemned Sin the Flesh The Seed of David Jesus Died a Human Being – Raised a Spirit Being The Six Days of Creation […]

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